MILAN NEWS. TOP SHOWS&ACCESSORIES. So, Milan Fashion Week Is Over—What Did We Think?

VOGUE NEWS&TRENDS

Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini

Photo: Getty Images

 

MILAN FASHION WEEK 2016

 

Roberto Cavalli

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Missoni

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Dolce & Gabbana

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigital.tv

MILAN FASHION WEEK Thoughts from VOGUE

As Vogue.com editors make their way to Paris for the last lap of the Fall 2016 season, they weigh in on the “freakiest” Milan Fashion Week in a long time. Curious? Read on for excerpts from the conversation.

Sally Singer, Vogue Creative Digital Director

It was not so long ago that Milan was synonymous, in fashion geography, with a sexy forthrightness. Sure, there was Marni, with its charming “waste-a-date” prints and proportions. Yes, there was Prada, which could be nerdy or nervy or Nerve.com. But overall, the city oozed louche luxury: curves at Dolce, glamazons at Gucci, bombshells at Versace, groupies and gypsies (of the hot cinematic kind) at Cavalli.

Nicole Phelps, Director, Vogue Runway
As a close watcher of Milan’s up-and-coming class, I can say that the Michele effect hasn’t necessarily been good for the city’s younger and untested designers. In less assured hands, the more-is-more-is-more aesthetic that’s currently dominating fashion can go badly wrong. It doesn’t help, of course, when you’re treated to a collection like Tomas Maier’s for Bottega Veneta in the middle of the week. His faultless pantsuits make nearly everything else look sloppy.

Sarah Mower, Vogue.com Chief Critic

I have the kind of brain that auto-deletes when on fashion-show overload. So, on this “laundry” day between Milan and Paris, I’m not feeling very intellectual about Milan, but I do know what’s coming out in the wash as far as what I, personally, actively want. I’m with Nicole about the Bottega Veneta tailoring—when it comes to it, I won’t be able to afford it, but bravo to Tomas Maier for endorsing simple, grown-up day-chic and for sending me scrabbling to see if there’s a long scarf in my hall wardrobe. On the point of footwear, Milan also made up my mind that ’40s-’70s platforms or otherwise lower, pointy kitten heels are the way forward for the long march through Paris (thank you to Gucci and Versace, respectively, for clarifying that). I’m glad also that all my glittery things can see the light of day again—a trend we saw through London but was endorsed in Milan by Dolce & Gabbana, Roberto Cavalli, et al. Otherwise:

Luke Leitch, Vogue.com Contributor
Quizzically alluring vs. sexy forthrightness, huh? Valorizing the rise of so-called man-repelling in this traditionally most-crotch-led fashion city is totally fair enough, Sally, but it makes me a little sad. Because while absolutely the idea of dressing in a manner appealing to the male gaze might rub up awkwardly against contemporary feminine self-identity, surely not all fashion need be visual bug spray for bros to register on the radar of credibility? Peter Dundas’s second outing for Cavalli, absolutely, was much more truly “Cavalli” than the first—and therefore featured a great many flesh-led direct appeals to the male libido seasoned by liberal application of flounce and ruffle.

Alessandra Codinha, Vogue.com Fashion News Editor
I’ll keep it short. We keep hearing that now is an exceptionally important time for Italian fashion, that Italy must be a workshop and not a museum, according to Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, whose appearance at an early luncheon last week was more exciting than that of any model or celebrity in the front row. (And who are we kidding—there really weren’t any celebrities.) And I agree with everyone above, that between Alessandro Michele’s shot in the arm all the way to Missoni’s return to form (with stops at Prada and Marni and Dolce & Gabbana in between), it felt like an exceptionally strong showing, particularly when it was designers playing to their own unique strengths. I think the continued emphasis on runway diversity and individuality is especially encouraging, as is the continued emphasis on romantic, emotion-driven dressing. Happily, the moral here seems to be that Italian fashion might just be living up to its promise. So, in short, bring it on, Paris:Allons-y!

Watch all of our Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear videos: 30

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Moschino

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As Vogue.com editors make their way to Paris for the last lap of the Fall 2016 season, they weigh in on the “freakiest” Milan Fashion Week in a long time. Curious? Read on for excerpts from the conversation.

Lähde: So, Milan Fashion Week Is Over—What Did We Think?

 

MILAN FASHION WEEK

TOP 5 SHOW

The Top 5 Shows of Milan Fashion Week

PHOTOS. INFO VOGUE.

 

The Top 5 Shows of Milan Fashion Week

1. Prada

The Top 5 Shows of Milan Fashion Week

2. Gucci

 3. Bottega Veneta

4.  Marni

5. Missoni

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7 BEST ACCESSORIES

Prada

Photo: Marcus Tondo / Indigital.tv
Dolce & Gabbana
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WATC ALL 7. INFO.

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